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03
April
2013

Our results at Mona Vale Chess Competition

Hello Chess Enthusiasts!
On Wed 27 March, 24 students from John Colet competed at the Northern Beaches Primary Schools Chess Challenge 2013.  Altogether, there were 264 students (88 teams) representing 17 schools!!
The John Colet children were magnificent - wonderfully behaved, great sportsmen and sportswomen.  What a great day.
I believe the final points ended up as follows:

Team D – (Yasha B, Daya C-H, Scout H) – 10.5 points - congratulations on 7th place!!
Team B – (Xavier S, Nathan C, Rex F) – 9.5 points

Team A – (Jarod C, Ryan B, Sean B) - 8 points
Team C – (Dominic S, Justin T, Lucas v de S) - 8 points
Team G – (Mi Mi P, Thomas J, Sean G) - 8 points

Team E – (Brigitte S, Ashleigh E, Maisy T) – 7.5 points
Team F – (Samuel L, Harry P, William W) – 7.5 points
Team H – (Kai P, Michael T, Luke B) -  6 Points
Fabulous effort.

Lessons Next Term-
Term 2 lessons will commence the first week back from school holidays.  That is:
Monday lessons on 6th May (second week back)
Wednesday lessons on 1st May (first week back)
Friday lessons on 3rd May.
Yours strategically,
Heather B


Categories: Chess & Clubs, John Colet

28
March
2013

5th class studies rainforests at the Zoo

On Wednesday 20th March 5th class went to Taronga Zoo for the whole day.

From the entrance gate we walked down the hill to the Asian elephants, passing the giraffes and chimpanzees on the way. We stopped to have morning tea, and then went to the Education centre. The zoo keepers said we were the best class ever at sitting in a circle.

While we were there the zoo keeper discussed rainforests with us. We were able to describe the four layers of the rainforest, Forest floor, Understorey, Canopy and Emergent. We were also able to discuss how the rainforests of the world are in danger from deforestation. The keeper sprayed his hands with water and then showed us a green tree frog, he had to use fresh, clean water because the frog needs to be kept wet and dirty water makes frogs sick and they can die. We also got to touch a python, a ring tailed possum and a stick insect, all of these animals live in the rainforest.

Next we went on the rainforest trail. First we watched the keepers washing the Asian elephants. They do this every day. We went through double doors to enter the aviary where we saw many rainforest birds and fish. At the end of the trail we saw the gibbon, fishing cat and then decided we needed lunch.

We ate together looking out across the harbour. We walked to the skyway via the seals and penguins but we weren’t allowed on it so we had to walk back. We split into two groups and saw the big cats and the komodo dragon. The boys also saw the reptile exhibit.

It was a hot day and we were really tired when we got back on the bus. Our day at the zoo was exciting, fun, interesting and good exercise.



Categories: Science & Maths, John Colet

28
March
2013

From our kitchen: 28/3/13

On the menu after Easter...


Mon

EASTER MONDAY - closed

Tues

SAUCY PASTA

Weds

NACHOS

Thurs

NOODLES (with veggie squiggles)

Fri

‘GOOD FRIDAY’ FRIED RICE

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

It was some relief to see my mistake on the last menu, I felt like I had got an entire week back, so my apologies for the calendar oversight.

The Easter break and the school holidays are nearly upon us so remember the one key rule to holiday eating, drinking and frivolity is WATER.

The humble glass of H2O has enormous healing and weight loss properties. It allows the body, particularly the brain to hydrate (or rehydrate depending on the size of the previous evening’s party). A headache, without accident, it simply your brain saying give me water, not paracetamol.

Water, with the help of haemoglobin, also delivers the water soluble vitamins C and B complex to the entire body. The water soluble vitamins are easily destroyed or washed away during food preparation. Try to steam vegetables, keep milk and grains away from strong light and wash vegetables when they are whole. Generally, water soluble vitamins are not harmful because the body excretes excess levels.

Water also cleans the liver, kidneys and all major organs of the body, so the more you drink, the cleaner your body is internally.

There is no hard rule to the consumption of water but if you are not drinking four 300ml bottles of water per day plus another for every hour of exercise, pregnant or outdoors you are depleting yourself of the hydration and vitamins necessary to keep you feeling bright and happy.

This holiday, think of adding a glass of water before your breakfast (inclusive of the Berrocca-if necessary), before every meal, between every alcoholic beverage, and before bed, your body will thank you.

Happy Easter to all!
Donna Moor

 

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

27
March
2013

From the Stage Coordinators: 28/3/13

Happy Easter to all – we hope that everyone enjoys the break and that the present balmy weather holds out.   Don’t forget to come back for the last two weeks of term!!  We know it’s tempting….

The Lower First performance and Easter Hat Parade was a delight and the parents obviously thought so too because there were many mobile phones clicking and even a few moist eyes!  The children visited all the other classes to wish everyone a Happy Easter.  This was enjoyed by one and all.

Great enthusiasm and excitement has been shown by the children for the lunch time Easter Egg Guessing Competition (“How Many Easter Eggs are in this jar?”)  set up by Donna Moor and her tireless kitchen crew.  We had guesses between 22 and 475, but the nearest guess was that of Brigitte S from 5th Class.  The answer was 114 and Brigitte guessed 113. The Easter eggs were shared with her whole class.    

Administration:  We are continuing our weekly feature highlighting one of the School’s departments.

We are all admirably and generously served by the Admin Dept. headed up by Christine Condos, the School’s Bursar.  Bav Bhandari is the Office Manager, and oversees Catering, After School Care and Uniforms, but most importantly she is the Paymaster who keeps the wolf from the door.

Carmen Griffiths is our “frontline” as the Receptionist, and you would all have had dealings with her in her many capacities, and also Bobbi Ladomatis who is on Reception once a week.  Bobbi  handles Student Health and Uniforms as well.   Toni Cleaves is our Facilities Manager who cares for our gardens and buildings and arranges maintenance and refurbishment  with ample help from Groundsman Karl Werner.  Alex Coubrough looks after Marketing and publishes the Weekly Note, as well as being very active in her role as a School parent.   Denise Farrelly looks after fees, and Marie –Laure Aymonier is a bookkeeper and visits us several times a week.

You would all have engaged with Lynne Werner, a very long-standing employee who now serves as the Registrar.   Mrs. Sarah Mane is Assistant to the Headmaster, and is and has been responsible in the last few years for work done on special projects.

I am sure you find all these Staff members very responsive and friendly in your dealings with them – we do!


Lower First and their Easter Hats

Categories: Lower First news (Kindy), Coordinators' Comments, John Colet

27
March
2013

5th class art incursion

Working with wax

Our 5th class had a day long art intensive in the art room  this week working with wax to create portraits. Inspired by artist Barbie Hooper who took the incursion, the students layered on the hot and cold wax and then cut into the wax layers to add detail. A thoroughly enjoyable day that extended the students' understanding of portrait painting through different mediums.

Categories: Art classes, John Colet

27
March
2013

Headmaster's Weekly Comment: 28/3/13

I usually use the space to talk about some aspect of the school’s underlying ethos and beliefs.  One of the aims of this is absolute transparency.  After all, if some of what we believe can be seen as a little out of the mainstream, then any cageyness would, quite rightly be viewed suspiciously.

But today I thought I’d raise a theme which, to me is very obvious.  If you look behind the spiritual, ethical, and character building aspect of John Colet School  – which we of course treat as of major importance – what is left is a focused and effective institution of learning.

Our aim has always been that John Colet School be a centre of academic excellence, in which all children thrive and are challenged to go beyond their best.  Hence the emphasis on the core NSW curriculum, with the added dimension of Shakespeare, Classical and Modern Languages, Art, Science, History, Singing and so on. 

We believe that a demanding program taught by excellent teachers will bring out the best in the children and create an environment where study and learning are enjoyable, and mastery is highly valued.

This is an ongoing project and we continue to monitor our performance.  For example, our NAPLAN results were characteristically excellent, except, this year, for Writing.  So we arranged for an all-day in-service on Writing over the Summer. 

On another front, the staff late last year and over the Summer, began to study the new national English curriculum with a view to implementing it next year.  This new curriculum roll out requires an enormous amount of work, which is well underway. 


Categories: Head of School Comment, John Colet

25
March
2013

Games with magnets

4th classes have been learning about magnetism in Science, and to conclude the work they have designed and made inventive games with magnets. 
Starting with brainstorming ideas and working out what materials they would need, the students worked in class time, mostly in pairs,  to bring their ideas to life.  Projects ranged from using magnetism to guide actors on a stage, to various 'fishing' games and mazes, to a crane that managed to lift its own weight.
After writing their work up as a procedure, complete with diagrams, students will present the challenges and pitfalls they experienced to the rest of their class.

Categories: Science & Maths, John Colet

25
March
2013

Building maths concepts

3rd class R boys have been having fun in maths exploring 3 dimensional shapes.  Working in pairs they have built a wide range of 3D shapes with skewers and blue tack- learning about vertices, faces and edges - and experimenting to find which shapes are the most stable.


Categories: Science & Maths, John Colet

22
March
2013

From our kitchen:25/3/13

On the menu this week...



Mon

TOMATO SOUP

Tues

PIZZA

Weds

DUTCH CHEESE & ZUCCHINI SLICE

Thurs

VEGGIES AND BEANS

Fri

FRIED RICE

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

This week in the kitchen we have been observing some great manners, helpfulness, service to others and the best ever...healthy eating habits. I thought it necessary to give praise to all the children who are observing their health and commend their general conduct in the Lunch Room. We have even seen some die hard lunch boxes disappear to take the leap of faith into the enjoyment of the shared meal. But remember, there is always something available for simple palates.

NB: Lunch boxes are not allowed in McLaren Hall without reference to extreme allergies and Head Mistress approval.

I would also like to take the time thank our Mums who ‘slave’ every day to produce extraordinary meals and side dishes for the children and staff alike.

I would also add that some classes have even had class discussions on how to help children with simple or undeveloped taste buds, whilst keeping everybody happy around their table. The true nature of John Colet comes out in some remarkable ways and it is a joy to see!

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

20
March
2013

Portraiture

Ahead of the Archibald Award announcements, 4th classes have been doing more work on portraiture.  They looked at the work of Victor Brauner (1903 - 1966), a surrealist painter and sculptor.  Brauner had a fascination for eyes - he had a glass eye, having been badly wounded in a fight - and was influenced by the modernists Picasso and Klee.  He is perhaps best known for his sculpture "Wolftable" (1947) but it was his "The Alphabet Face" that 4th classes used as inspiration for their own surrealist portraits. 
Many of the art classes this week have been listening to The Adventures of Odysseus while working - totally absorbing!

Categories: Art classes, John Colet

15
March
2013

Headmaster's Weekly Comment

It’s wonderful, aside from residual jetlag, to be back from foreign climes.  Profound thanks to Mrs McKendrick and Mrs Donald and everyone who helped keep the ship on a steady course in my absence.  It shows that the school is really a team effort, rather than a one man band. 

While overseas I presented a paper at a conference of UK independent Head Teachers on Government Funding of Non-Government Schools in Australia.  It was a load of laughs.  It was interesting, in my research to discover that in 1962 non-government schools didn’t receive a single penny from the government, and, in 2013 we receive $8.8 billion, 21% of the education budget.  And that this came about because of Mother Celestine, the Headmistress of Our Lady of Mercy Preparatory school in Goulburn, and her three missing toilets. 

The participants at the conference were delighted at the serendipity of this confluence of characters in 1961, which led, after threats by the Department to withhold registration because of those toilets, to the Catholic schools’ strike in the following year.  This in turn led by inches to the levels of funding we have today.  It is fair to say that some aspects of this story brought the house down.

After the conference (where Mrs Mane and I met HRH Princess Anne) I visited our sister schools in London and met with various head teachers and others.

But it is very, very nice to be home and to see the staff, parents and, especially the children.


Categories: Head of School Comment, John Colet

15
March
2013

Maths camp

On the 11th - 13th March, Eloise, Ellie, Josh and I went on a maths camp to Elanora Heights conference centre.  We had to wake up at 7:00 to go for a morning swim, then we did maths for 13 and a half hours.  We weren't allowed to go to our cabins until 9:30pm.
We did a lot of maths in that time.  We did so much that at the end of the camp I had an insane headache from all the maths.
I'm so glad that I got to go.  It was such a great opportunity and a really good experience.  I learnt so many new things, such as how to define a problem and collect and organise the data.  We also learnt to work as a team, and how to enjoy maths and make maths fun.   I am a better mathmatician now. I enjoyed it so much and I'm sure everyone else that went did too.
By Chloe Thomson, 6th class

Categories: Science & Maths, John Colet

15
March
2013

Tongue twisters and dandelions

It's all about the voice...

Lower First students are learning about voice projection and really enjoy the process with our drama teacher Zoe Emanuel.  Today they pretended to blow the petals off a dandelion, while making clear, loud and hard syllable sounds (no shouting or yelling!).  Then there were tongue twisters - it's harder than you think to say "Mixed Biscuits" five times in a row, clearly.  In another exercise, the children were seeds growing as Miss Emanuel watered them.  Who had the most unusual flowers?
The infants Shakespeare Festival will be held at the school in August, so these early drama lessons get them moving and speaking more confidently, ready to start learning their lines.
 

Categories: Lower First news (Kindy), Writing & Speaking, Shakespeare & Drama, John Colet

15
March
2013

2nd classes' Coastal trip

Studying wet and dry environments at the Coastal Environment Centre

On Friday 8th March, all of Year 2 from John Colet went to Long Reef in Collaroy.
We went for a big walk around the rock pools. We went and saw starfish, anemones, crab and lots of limpets and oysters.  We didn't see a blue ringed octopus.
We ate our lunch on the stairs at Long Reef.  It was a hot day.  The walk was hard because my bag was heavy but I really enjoyed looking and touching the rock pool.
By Amy, 2nd class C

...We went on a school excursion to the Coastal Environment Centre at North Narrabeen.  The excursion was really interesting and fun. 
We went on a rock platform at the beach.  I saw and felt anemones.  They felt jelly like. I really enjoyed seeing and feeling all the sea creatures.
I had a great time and I would love to go again.
By Jonathan, 2nd class C
 



Categories: Science & Maths, John Colet

15
March
2013

From our kitchen: 18/3/13

On the menu this week...



Mon

EGG AND SALAD SANDWICHES

Tues

VEGGIE SPAGHETTI

Weds

ROASTED MIXED VEGETABLES

Thurs

NACHOS (with salsa and sour cream)

Fri

KIDS MINESTRONE SOUP (with garlic croutons)

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

Recently I’ve been researching diabetes to help keep our diabetic students well balanced and their post-meal blood glucose levels even. The most interesting thing here is that the required diet for a diabetic is one of the best for all of us. It always comes down to carbohydrates NOT being the enemy, but instead being a useful cultural preference that can be tilted in our favour easily with some simple substitutions.

Low Carb or Low GI? That is the question! For many years, the ‘Low Carb’ diet (lifestyle) has been the one preferred for losing weight and maintaining blood glucose levels. Now that we have the added benefit of the Low GI options, the answer is simple. The Low GI diet is the very best for all of us.

‘Low Carb’ diets, in the short term, for post-holiday or pre-holiday if you’re so inclined, do have benefits. They drop weight fast, reduce blood glucose levels and lower blood triglycerides (fat). This can be maintained for very short periods of time by most of us, but very difficult socially and realistically. The downside is that the long term deprivation of carbohydrates eventually raises the LDL (Low Density Lipoproteins-cholesterols which are bad, because they cause heart disease). Basically, the lower the density the worse it gets.

Low GI diet really does help reduce post-meal blood glucose spikes. It helps you lose weight more progressively and sustainably and it has even been proven that it lowers average blood glucose levels, improves blood cholesterol and triglycerides (stored energy source that are mostly stored in the VLDL-Very Low Density Lipoproteins-very bad). The best news is that it does delay development of diabetes in those of us at risk.

The best part of a Low GI diet is that it simply involves the substitution of high GI food (white processed sugary stuff) to Low GI foods (wholegrain unprocessed brown stuff) for each category of foods. Eg white bread to multigrain sourdough spelt, cup cake to sugarless bran muffin, white rice to brown rice. Don’t forget to change some of those high animal fat products into healthy vegetable oils and foods.

Remember to substitute not avoid. The Rule is simple - 40/40/20/80.  Energy should come from - 40% carbs, 40% fats, and 20% protein, and then choose the right ones 80% of the time. 
Donna Moor
 

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

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