John Colet
21
February
2014

On the vegetarian lunch menu this week...

Mon

INDIAN CURRY (with minted yoghurt)

Tue

SAUCY PASTA

Wed

FRIED RICE (and fruit salad yoghurt)

Thu

VEGETABLE & LEEK or TOMATO SOUP

Fri

HOT DOGS (PISA children – packed lunch!)

Vegan, gluten free, egg free, dairy free options provided

We treated the Infants to a pizza day last Wednesday (during the Primary Swimming Carnival) to show our appreciation of their good manners, clean eating and, most recognisably, their value of gratitude. As you can imagine it was very well received! The Primary children will have their turn.
For new parents, please be assured that we are providing your children with a well balanced and nutritious meal everyday. There is always a small portion of plain (i.e bland) food for those whose taste preferences are still developing. Fresh fruits and vegetables, bread, butter, sultanas, yoghurt and cheese are always available.
We have carefully evolved the menu over many years in consultation with an independent dietician. Sweet spreads such as jam and honey, and peanut butter have not been served for several years, in accordance with our nutritional and nut aware policy.
The weekly menu balance must take into consideration many things; the weather, season, budget, taste, time, age appropriateness, texture, likes and dislikes of the student majority, staff, school policy and the NSW Government regulations.
It is our happy duty to offer a healthy, vegetarian meal to all students and we support them to attempt the meal that is offered with respect and gratitude.
If you would like to see and experience more, you are welcome to join the kitchen staff and myself for a week to ‘walk a week in our shoes’ and to appreciate the “John Colet Lunch.” Please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you would like to take up this offer.

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

21
February
2014

The third part of the John Colet School Creed considered

This week we are considering that part of the School Creed which recommends that we learn about the Universe.
This is a simple one (although not necessarily easy!)  The universe is a highly complex mechanism of interacting material and energetic forces; but it is governed by a few simple principles.  There is the law of attraction which can be seen in the form of gravity and magnetism, but also as love and friendship.  
There is the principle of exchange of substances – where everyone and everything provides food and support for everything else.  Plants feed us with oxygen, and we supply them with carbon dioxide.  And this also works on a subtle level – we provide love, and happiness, and encouragement to others; and we find that we receive these in return.  On the other hand if we approach people and events with suspicion, anger and selfishness we will find our lives become, in Shakespeare’s phrase, “cabined, cribbed, confined, bound in”.
One formulation of this rule is “do unto others, as you would have them do unto you”. Another way of putting it, which Leon MacLaren often used, is:  Give what you think you lack.
On another front of learning about the universe each class is going to institute “Fun Facts” activities and quizzes, because we would like all children to have good general knowledge:  continents and countries; rivers and mountains; planets and constellations; famous men and women.  You may like to join in by testing their general knowledge and your own.
Here’s one: what is the longest word in English with one vowel?  (Hint: it has 9 letters; and the first and last letters are the same; and the vowel is “e”).

Categories: Head of School Comment, John Colet

19
February
2014

Report from our P&F

With a whip around of the large circle of parents at the first P&F meeting of the year, we discovered what we'd like from the P&F this year. Some quotes:

"Bottle the JC spirit"

"Communication"

"Deliver what the parents want"

So what can you do to support our school right now?

The walkathon on Friday afternoon, 21st March
Wonderful parent from year 2 Linda Z has (thankfully) popped her hand up to be the coordinator for this great and easy fundraiser. Let’s get behind her and show her some love and support.
Get in on the Gala Dinner, which is a big bash to launch celebrations for 30 years of our wonderful John Colet. "Simple and elegant, with a twist”. Veteran events coordinator Georgie C  is making this one happen and has a list of roles. Oh, and you'll need to save the date, 6th September 2014.
Get in touch with viable fundraising or community-building ideas. We have a few new things on the menu, including tea towels, hot cross buns, a disco night (indeed!!). Does your company offer grants, do you know a hot-cross bun baker, have you run an event that is a guaranteed success? Sarah O  is pulling this list together, so get in touch, and we can program your idea in over the next 18 months. Don't say we don't plan ahead.
The detailed minutes will follow. Make sure you come to the next one.
 
With love,
The P&F Executive 2014

Categories: P&F, John Colet

14
February
2014

First week of inter-school sport results

Pisa Sports Reports

Today the John Colet Junior Boys team played Covenant Christian School in T-ball.  We won 17 – 12.  The man of the match was Charlie as he caught an amazing ball in the out-fielders position and did great batting.  We played excellently and had lots of fun! We are looking forward to next week’s match.
Leo and Annikan

The Junior Girls versed Covenant Christian in T-ball.  The score was 11 – 15, we lost but we all did our best.  Mi-Mi was our Captain.  Our girls of the game were Milla and Amy.  Milla had a lot of home runs, and Amy tried her very best.
-Samsara, Vice-Captain

Senior Boys played cricket.  We lost 57 - 20 against Northern Beaches.  Although we lost, we bowled a lot of wickets and caught a lot of catches and batted quite well.  The man of the match was Ethan because of his amazing catch but everyone else played well as well.
-    Lucas and Xavier

The Senior Girls played softball against Northern Beaches.  We won 10 - 5, which was fantastic.  We all played well but the girl of the game was Roxana because she volunteered to get all the balls the catcher missed.   
- Tally, Captain

Categories: John Colet

14
February
2014

On the vegetarian lunch menu this week...

Lots of children trying new foods



Mon

CHIPS AND BEANS

Tue

SAUSAGE ROLLS

Wed

MILD INDIAN CURRY

Thu

MEXICAN RICE (with garlic and ginger)
Fri

NACHOS
Gluten free, dairy free, egg free and vegan options always available.

This past week has seen a great many students trying new foods and having healthy eating habits. Most recognisable is on our Salad Wrap with peri-peri mayo day. The children ate a monstrous 220 large wraps, 10kgs of tomatoes, 8 lettuces, 6kgs of cucumbers, 5kgs of cheese, 5kgs of carrot, 1kg of mayo, 2 kg of pears, 1kg of grapes, 1kg of nectarines and 2kg of bananas.
For this massive healthy effort I have decided to test out our new lunch ladies with a school favourite next week…sausage rolls!
Well-done and great effort to everyone.

NB. If any forgotten items are left in the kitchen or at after school care, they will be taken to the office and placed in lost and found each morning.
Donna

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

14
February
2014

Lower First children settling in well

A report from our two Lower First (kindy) teachers

Lower First have settled in very well, with ease and enthusiasm.  They have been most attentive in learning a few simple behaviours which have enabled them to self-regulate and participate fully in the experience of school life.  For example they can pack their bags and line up successfully on our ‘lining-up ladder’.  This painted ladder allows the children to arrange themselves into a line without a fuss.  On the floor for learning time the children have participated in ‘Positive Behaviour Support’ lessons.  In these lessons children are taught appropriate and safe ways of interacting with others through modelling, role play and discussion.

The children are well engaged throughout the day with a balance of activities which are presented in a fun, yet rigorous manner.  They have completed work in all areas of the new Australian Curriculum and are well on their way to beginning to write their first sentences and are showing signs of readiness for number processes.  As we endeavour to offer the finest of things to the children they have also been exposed to fine music, art, artists and philosophy.

Teachers of Lower First 2014
Robyn Tefay and Lea-Ann Connell

Categories: Lower First news (Kindy), John Colet

14
February
2014

Student leaders active in their roles

From the Stage Coordinators, Mrs McKendrick and Mrs Donald

A busy week ahead, from the Primary children’s point of view, the most important event is the Swimming Carnival on Wednesday at 10.45 at the Killarney Swim Centre!  The House Captains are very excited about the prospect – this is the first major event of their tenure.  They and their assistants had a meeting with their respective houses to encourage them to show good sportsmanship and do their best.   We hope to see many parents there – it is always a wonderful and exciting event.
Also next week is the Reception given by the Board of Governors – we also encourage you to come to this to help welcome new parents and to meet members of the Board.  This is in the MacLaren Hall from 7.30 to 9.00 p.m. and refreshments will be served:  this is another occasion where Head Boy, Head Girl and House Captains can demonstrate their leadership and also have the opportunity to serve the school.
Sunday 23rd is the Phillip House Working Bee – a wonderful day to get out of bed early and spend time with friends!
Respect – our term’s focus in the practice of the School Values - this week concentrates on the question:  “Is this action considerate of the happiness and comfort of others?”

Categories: Coordinators' Comments, John Colet

14
February
2014

What makes a human being unique?

Headmaster's weekly comment

Our School Creed encourages us to “learn about God, Man the Universe, and our relationship to them”.  Last week I discussed the first of these, God.  Now it is Man’s turn.

“Man” of course means all of humanity – men, women, boys and girls. And the question here is, apart from biology and physiology and genetics, what is it which makes us human?  What is a human being? What makes a human being unique?  As Psalm 8 asks: What is man that thou art mindful of him? 

Is it the power of reason, humour, enthusiasm, an opposable thumb, magnanimity, an upright spine, marriage, creativity and innovation, a capacity for self-sacrificial love, a sense of the divine, the ability to delay our gratification?  All of the above?

Terry Pratchett tells us that man lives “where the falling angel meets the rising ape”, indicating that we have characteristics of both, and the potential to move in either direction.  To save us, and those around us, from beastly behaviour we are given simple rules and ethical and moral standards.  Following these – love thy neighbor, live honestly, treat others with care and respect – we can manifest the “better angels of our nature” (Abraham Lincoln).

At John Colet School we endeavour to present the children with a large view of their own humanity and instil a sense of gratitude for the gifts inherent in human nature.  We also try to communicate a sense of responsibility to others, which finds expression in the school values, particularly Care, Service and Respect.



Categories: Head of School Comment, John Colet

07
February
2014

More on "Respect"

At Assembly the Headmaster is talking to the children each week about some aspect of this Creed, and naturally, he began with God, giving a simple and delightful exposition.  This Creed is designed to set the children to thinking about their lives in a larger context.
Our practice of Respect follows on very readily from these considerations.  This week we have been looking at Unity, as described last week, and now we will examine and practise the second aspect which is “Is this action safe for myself and others?”
The children have been looking very smart in their uniforms, especially 5th Class, who are now in the senior uniform.  Congratulations to the children, especially in having their sunhats for play!

Categories: Coordinators' Comments, John Colet

07
February
2014

‘Cooked’ v. ‘Raw’

On the vegetarian school menu this week...


Mon

MOROCCAN RICE AND 'MINCE'
(with minted yoghurt)
Tue

CHEESE & SALAD WRAPS
(with mild peri-peri mayo)
Wed SOY VEGETABLE STIR-FRY
Thu

SQUIGGLY NOODLES
(with vegie strips)
Fri

PUMPKIN OR TOMATO SOUP
(with garlic croutons)
Vegan, dairy free, gluten free and egg free options available.


There are a few different trains of thought on the topic of cooked versus raw food. Generally the raw movement maintains that all of the nutrients are retained to support optimal health. There is no doubt that eating raw food is necessary for good health but there are certain vegetables that do require cooking simply because it easier for the body to digest and absorb the nutrients.


Why? You may ask…Heat facilitates the releases of antioxidants by breaking down cell walls allowing for optimal absorption. My favourite is that of the antioxidant lycopene, found in tomatoes. It is absorbed more easily from cooked tomatoes. The humble potato when cooked, release phytonutrients and improves the digestibility of the starches.

As always, a healthy balance and moderation is the key to great health.

Eat Well
Donna Moor


Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

07
February
2014

Following our own inclinations to learn about God

Headmaster's weekly comment

In assembly the children recite the school creed:

We are here to learn about God, Man, the Universe and our relationship to them; by which means we may fulfil our bond to remember the Creator, to abide by the fine regulations of the Creation, and to return to the Absolute.

This is a formulation put together many years ago by Leon MacLaren, the founder of the school, and, as such has some archaisms.  But it is part of the tradition of the school, so we say it as formulated, and then we apply our faculties of reason to discover its meaning and to make it practical.

The first thing we are here to learn about is God.

Most people think of God as an all-powerful, creative and intelligent Supreme Being, much like the universal Father prayed to in The Lord’s Prayer.  This appeals to those of us of a devotional nature who use prayer and worship to discover His nature and purpose.

For others less inclined to devotion, and of a more contemplative nature, God can be met as the still small voice within.  The voice of conscience; the guiding light which tells us what to do and what not to do; the ultimate Self within who watches all our physical, mental, and emotional ups and downs and is unaffected by them.

For others, the way to God is through service to others.  And these people, more inclined to action than devotion or contemplation, love their neighbour as themselves. They look after those in need, they feed the hungry, and they comfort the afflicted.

By any of these means we can follow our own individual inclinations and learn about God.

Categories: Head of School Comment, John Colet

31
January
2014

Multifaith education gets children thinking

The sun, with all those planets revolving round it and depending on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else in the universe to do.
GALILEO GALILEI (1564-1642)

I was prompted this week to think about the relationship of Science, Philosophy and Religion when, in a 3rd class Scripture lesson, I was asked how the dinosaurs fit in with the account of the Creation in Genesis.  

And, as if that weren’t enough, in 4th class we started Buddhism by discussing the nature of Suffering, and the Buddha’s desire to bring Suffering to an end.  One girl then asked if it was even possible to end Suffering.  Wasn’t it just a natural and inevitable part of life?  And one of the boys then suggested that Suffering was not just natural, but necessary and useful to give us a full experience of life.

These are deep questions and the fact that seven and eight year olds discuss them freely shows how natural such enquiry is to human nature.  While we call it the Scientific Method, the examination of data, the formulation of hypotheses, and robust disputation are necessary for all disciplines which like Science, Philosophy and Theology aim to uncover the nature of reality. In this ongoing project, fundamentalism and slavish adherence to orthodoxy are barriers to understanding rather than a bridge.

The aim of all these fields of study is the discovery of truth.  They may come at it from different angles but, as a Japanese girl once told me, “There are many paths up the mountain, but only one view from the top.”

Categories: Head of School Comment, John Colet

31
January
2014

On the vegetarian lunch menu this week...

Sneaking vegetables and pulses into lunches



Mon

POTATO AND CHICKPEA CURRY

Tue

SAVOURY RICE

Wed

BAKED BEANS ON TOAST

Thu

CHILLI AND RICE

Fri

SPICY TOMATO GNOCCHI

Vegan, gluten free, dairy free and egg free options always available.


One of the many goals in the school kitchen is to maximise the food’s nutrients while presenting it in a child-friendly manner.
We try to incorporate cooked and raw foods in each meal to ensure they retain all their goodness. Fruits, vegetables & legumes make up the core lunch foods. When we cook our vegetables and pulses they are steamed or totally incorporated into a ‘one-pot meal’, which retains their goodness and flavour. For many vegetables and all legumes, the cooking process makes them easier to digest and absorb the nutrients.
Our seasonal fruits and raw vegetables are chosen for their highest nutrient value and freshness.

Eat Well
Donna

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

31
January
2014

Respect - a core school value

From the Stage Coordinators, Mrs McKendrick and Mrs Donald

In the Vision, Mission and Values document of John Colet School, the practice of Respect, which is our practice this term, asks certain questions which are aimed at directing and guiding actions:
Work together with love, honour and respect for one another.
Practice:       Respect
1.    Does the action unify?
2.    Is this safe for myself and others?
3.    Is it considerate of the happiness and comfort of others?
4.    Is it honourable, respectful and dignified?
5.    Does this action reflect well on my nation, school, family and myself?
These are very worthwhile considerations at any age or stage of life, and if we all asked ourselves these questions in the moments before actions and decisions – what a different place the world would be!  Our responsibility is to put these considerations before the children, and help and encourage them to apply them to their actions.
We will begin with the first question:  Does the action unify?
•    Is it to the benefit of all involved?
•    Will it bring us together?
•    Does it exclude anyone?
Home support on these questions is very valuable.  Copy them and pin them up on the fridge!
Our first event on the Calendar is the Primary Swimming Carnival in February: more information will be forthcoming.
Lower First had a wonderful start to their school life.  They all seemed very happy, settled and mature. 
In fact everyone has got off to a good, steady start and we are looking forward to a very rewarding and productive year.


John Colet Head Girl Jaanvi Khandhar with some of our Lower First students on their first day.

Categories: Coordinators' Comments, John Colet

24
January
2014

School kitchen ready for lunchtimes

On the vegetarian school menu this week...



Mon

AUSTRALIA DAY HOLIDAY

Tue

CHEESY HOT DOGS

Wed

TOMATO & VEGETABLE PASTA

Thu

NACHOS AMIGOS
(with cheese, salsa & sour cream sides)

Fri

ASIAN FRIED RICE

Vegan, dairy free, gluten free and egg free options also available. 

Welcome back to this wonderful New Year. As we settle back into our routine of school and early mornings it helpful to remember that many parts of your child’s life have shifted from these patterns. Children can and do forget many simple factors such as how to get ready on time for school. It is our responsibility as parents to remember these are great changes in their life, even if it seems minor to us. Basically it is resilience training, something we are losing with the micro-managing of today’s kids. Resilient children will understand things like how to catch the next bus if they miss their normal bus or something as simple as disappointment if they lose a game.

In the kitchen, resilience comes from accepting and eating what is given to you for lunch, tasting foods, which generally may not be the same as ‘Mum cooks it’ or waiting for another person to pass you the food.

Please help your children by encouraging them to eat, try and accept their lunches and you have helped them on a healthy path to great nutrition. So if they complain to you about their lunches it is generally because it is unfamiliar or not exactly like yours, and even worse there may be a visible vegetable! Remember – a little neglect and a few ‘no’s’ go a long way…it is teaching them resilience, respect, acceptance and thankfulness.

Resilient children make for very happy, balanced adults.



Eat Well

Donna

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

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