John Colet
20
March
2013

Portraiture

Ahead of the Archibald Award announcements, 4th classes have been doing more work on portraiture.  They looked at the work of Victor Brauner (1903 - 1966), a surrealist painter and sculptor.  Brauner had a fascination for eyes - he had a glass eye, having been badly wounded in a fight - and was influenced by the modernists Picasso and Klee.  He is perhaps best known for his sculpture "Wolftable" (1947) but it was his "The Alphabet Face" that 4th classes used as inspiration for their own surrealist portraits. 
Many of the art classes this week have been listening to The Adventures of Odysseus while working - totally absorbing!

Categories: Art classes, John Colet

15
March
2013

Headmaster's Weekly Comment

It’s wonderful, aside from residual jetlag, to be back from foreign climes.  Profound thanks to Mrs McKendrick and Mrs Donald and everyone who helped keep the ship on a steady course in my absence.  It shows that the school is really a team effort, rather than a one man band. 

While overseas I presented a paper at a conference of UK independent Head Teachers on Government Funding of Non-Government Schools in Australia.  It was a load of laughs.  It was interesting, in my research to discover that in 1962 non-government schools didn’t receive a single penny from the government, and, in 2013 we receive $8.8 billion, 21% of the education budget.  And that this came about because of Mother Celestine, the Headmistress of Our Lady of Mercy Preparatory school in Goulburn, and her three missing toilets. 

The participants at the conference were delighted at the serendipity of this confluence of characters in 1961, which led, after threats by the Department to withhold registration because of those toilets, to the Catholic schools’ strike in the following year.  This in turn led by inches to the levels of funding we have today.  It is fair to say that some aspects of this story brought the house down.

After the conference (where Mrs Mane and I met HRH Princess Anne) I visited our sister schools in London and met with various head teachers and others.

But it is very, very nice to be home and to see the staff, parents and, especially the children.


Categories: Head of School Comment, John Colet

15
March
2013

Maths camp

On the 11th - 13th March, Eloise, Ellie, Josh and I went on a maths camp to Elanora Heights conference centre.  We had to wake up at 7:00 to go for a morning swim, then we did maths for 13 and a half hours.  We weren't allowed to go to our cabins until 9:30pm.
We did a lot of maths in that time.  We did so much that at the end of the camp I had an insane headache from all the maths.
I'm so glad that I got to go.  It was such a great opportunity and a really good experience.  I learnt so many new things, such as how to define a problem and collect and organise the data.  We also learnt to work as a team, and how to enjoy maths and make maths fun.   I am a better mathmatician now. I enjoyed it so much and I'm sure everyone else that went did too.
By Chloe Thomson, 6th class

Categories: Science & Maths, John Colet

15
March
2013

Tongue twisters and dandelions

It's all about the voice...

Lower First students are learning about voice projection and really enjoy the process with our drama teacher Zoe Emanuel.  Today they pretended to blow the petals off a dandelion, while making clear, loud and hard syllable sounds (no shouting or yelling!).  Then there were tongue twisters - it's harder than you think to say "Mixed Biscuits" five times in a row, clearly.  In another exercise, the children were seeds growing as Miss Emanuel watered them.  Who had the most unusual flowers?
The infants Shakespeare Festival will be held at the school in August, so these early drama lessons get them moving and speaking more confidently, ready to start learning their lines.
 

Categories: Lower First news (Kindy), Writing & Speaking, Shakespeare & Drama, John Colet

15
March
2013

2nd classes' Coastal trip

Studying wet and dry environments at the Coastal Environment Centre

On Friday 8th March, all of Year 2 from John Colet went to Long Reef in Collaroy.
We went for a big walk around the rock pools. We went and saw starfish, anemones, crab and lots of limpets and oysters.  We didn't see a blue ringed octopus.
We ate our lunch on the stairs at Long Reef.  It was a hot day.  The walk was hard because my bag was heavy but I really enjoyed looking and touching the rock pool.
By Amy, 2nd class C

...We went on a school excursion to the Coastal Environment Centre at North Narrabeen.  The excursion was really interesting and fun. 
We went on a rock platform at the beach.  I saw and felt anemones.  They felt jelly like. I really enjoyed seeing and feeling all the sea creatures.
I had a great time and I would love to go again.
By Jonathan, 2nd class C
 



Categories: Science & Maths, John Colet

15
March
2013

From our kitchen: 18/3/13

On the menu this week...



Mon

EGG AND SALAD SANDWICHES

Tues

VEGGIE SPAGHETTI

Weds

ROASTED MIXED VEGETABLES

Thurs

NACHOS (with salsa and sour cream)

Fri

KIDS MINESTRONE SOUP (with garlic croutons)

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

Recently I’ve been researching diabetes to help keep our diabetic students well balanced and their post-meal blood glucose levels even. The most interesting thing here is that the required diet for a diabetic is one of the best for all of us. It always comes down to carbohydrates NOT being the enemy, but instead being a useful cultural preference that can be tilted in our favour easily with some simple substitutions.

Low Carb or Low GI? That is the question! For many years, the ‘Low Carb’ diet (lifestyle) has been the one preferred for losing weight and maintaining blood glucose levels. Now that we have the added benefit of the Low GI options, the answer is simple. The Low GI diet is the very best for all of us.

‘Low Carb’ diets, in the short term, for post-holiday or pre-holiday if you’re so inclined, do have benefits. They drop weight fast, reduce blood glucose levels and lower blood triglycerides (fat). This can be maintained for very short periods of time by most of us, but very difficult socially and realistically. The downside is that the long term deprivation of carbohydrates eventually raises the LDL (Low Density Lipoproteins-cholesterols which are bad, because they cause heart disease). Basically, the lower the density the worse it gets.

Low GI diet really does help reduce post-meal blood glucose spikes. It helps you lose weight more progressively and sustainably and it has even been proven that it lowers average blood glucose levels, improves blood cholesterol and triglycerides (stored energy source that are mostly stored in the VLDL-Very Low Density Lipoproteins-very bad). The best news is that it does delay development of diabetes in those of us at risk.

The best part of a Low GI diet is that it simply involves the substitution of high GI food (white processed sugary stuff) to Low GI foods (wholegrain unprocessed brown stuff) for each category of foods. Eg white bread to multigrain sourdough spelt, cup cake to sugarless bran muffin, white rice to brown rice. Don’t forget to change some of those high animal fat products into healthy vegetable oils and foods.

Remember to substitute not avoid. The Rule is simple - 40/40/20/80.  Energy should come from - 40% carbs, 40% fats, and 20% protein, and then choose the right ones 80% of the time. 
Donna Moor
 

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

13
March
2013
13
March
2013

Ceramic artists at work

All our Infants students had the chance to squish, roll and mould clay in ceramic art classes this week.  The lessons were lead by Krystan Taylor from Ceramics in Schools and the children listened hard to each step-by-step instruction.
Upper First C (pictured) each made crocodiles, which fits in with their aboriginal art work studies, while 2nd classes are making rainforest trees.  Lower First (kindy) classes are making wall hangings showing their family members.
The works will be fired, then painted and glazed at the start of Term 2.   Come and see the final results at our Open Day (Sunday 26th May).

   


Categories: Lower First news (Kindy), Art classes, John Colet

13
March
2013

The First Fleet

Learning about the life of convicts

On Thursday 21st February, 4th class went on an excursion to The Rocks in the city.  We are studying about The First Fleet in HSIE and went to learn more about convicts.
We had a tour guide called Vickie and she gave us each some tunics to wear, white bonnets for girls and straw hats for boys.  She gave the Captains and General special uniforms and hats to wear.  She also gave us cards that told us who we were and information about us.  My name was Sarah Bellamy, 18, and I was married to James Bloodworth and we had 8 children.  I was brought out on the Lady Penrith. 
Eugenia
4th class D

...I dressed up as Captain John Hunter.  I was Captain on the Sirius which was the ship Captain Phillip travelled on.  I arrived here in 1788 at Sydney Cove.  I am 51 years old and I brought back food to the colony.  They were always happy to see me and I was their hero.
Maisy
4th class D

   

Categories: Writing & Speaking, John Colet

13
March
2013

Entry in for Gallipoli Art Award

6th class students have finished their individually etched horses on watercolour backgrounds.  They are now being framed, ready for judging in the Gallipoli Art Award.
This is the eighth year that John Colet's  6th class has entered the award, and we remain the only school to take part. Each year we've been thrilled to be hung as finalists in the Award, and be part of the exhibition at the Gallipoli Memorial Club in the city. The students are also invited to attend the prize giving lunch.
Pictured below are the horses being positioned for their trip to the framer. Good luck for this year, 6th class! 

Categories: Art classes, John Colet

13
March
2013

Enjoying eggs

This week 3rd classes practised drawing using larger arm movements from the shoulder, rather than the wrist, in order to achieve the generous oval shape of an A3 sized egg. 
And then there was the joy of patterning them with luscious pastels in irridescent Easter colours. 
 

Categories: Art classes, John Colet

13
March
2013

From the stage coordinators: 18/3/13

Welcome back to the Headmaster – we managed without him, but he was sorely missed, and we don’t envy him his email backlog!  Welcome also to Mrs. Mane, who went with him.

Respect:  At Assembly on Monday, we had some beautiful examples of ways in which the children could respect each other.  This is our continuing practice for this week, and it would be wonderful if it could spill over to respect for siblings!!

The Walkathon is looming on the horizon.    Your children should be working hard to get as many sponsors as possible – we heard a rumour that there are great expectations that we will raise a record amount.  A reminder that every child will need to be sun protected – sun hats, water, and well hydrated legs!   Sports uniform of course, since it is Friday anyway, and PISA children will be hurried to the oval as soon as possible.  PISA children are to bring their usual packed lunch, but the rest of the school will eat in the dining room in the normal way.

Sanskrit:  Many thanks are due to the dedicated and enthusiastic ladies who come to John Colet to teach Sanskrit to the children on a weekly basis.  They are currently preparing the children for the annual Sanskrit Recitation, as well as teaching the Sanskrit alphabet, grammar and vocabulary; this is presented in story form for translation at the various class levels, and begins in a very simple way in Lower First.   You will all have read about the Sanskrit dedication (the pause) that we use, and copies are available at the Reception desk.

Categories: Coordinators' Comments, John Colet

08
March
2013

Buoyancy (or why did the Titanic float, then sink?)

The topic in Junior Science Club this week was buoyancy: Why do things float? Everyone tried experimenting at each of our four stations to investigate. Click  "Continue Reading"   to find out what our Junior scientists got up to at each station.
 

Categories: Science & Maths, John Colet

08
March
2013

Headmaster's Weekly Comment: 11/3/13

The school has a vision, a mission and values. These have been expressed many times in various ways. One way is to say that our vision is for the children to be Happy, Strong and Accomplished.

Happiness is available if we spend at least some of our time trying to be a source of happiness – that is, to give happiness to others rather than to spend all our time trying to get it.

Strength is measured by how much we can overcome ourselves rather than defeat others. In other words by how much we meet our own selfishness, fear and greed and turn them into compassion, courage and generosity.

And accomplishment means the acquisition of knowledge and the mastery of skills which make us valuable and useful to our friends, family and fellow citizens.

We would hope that our curriculum and the general atmosphere of lively enquiry, spirited debate and compassionate care – and of course the enthusiastic support of the parent body - go a long way towards producing fine young men and women who are happy, strong and accomplished.

So far our graduates have shown that the school has been of some help in this endeavour.

From the files, dated Week 6, Term 1, 2010.  Headmaster will be back from 14th March.

Categories: Head of School Comment, John Colet

08
March
2013

From the Stage Coordinators: 11/3/13

Value being practised: Respect.  The children have been encouraged to respect each other in every way.  This is proceeding well, and has been enthusiastically received by the children.

The new issue of our pamphlet on the School’s Vision, Mission and Values has been published.  Copies, as promised, have been sent to the parents of the new Lower First Class.  If any other parent wishes an updated copy, please speak to Mrs. Griffiths at the Reception desk.  And by the way, Lower First parents will also soon be receiving a Sanskrit and transliterated version of our “Pause”.  Mrs. Griffiths will also have copies of these available for anyone else who wishes one.

The Headmaster and Mrs. Mane are currently at the Headmasters’ Conference at which he is speaking, and we have had brief emails letting us know that all is going well there.  Look forward to “breaking news” about it on his return!

Shakespeare is looming again and Zoe Emanuel begins her drama coaching in the Infants’ Department this week.  Rehearsals will begin in earnest next term, and the performances for the Infants’ Shakespeare Festival will be held at school at the beginning of Term 3. 

Good news - Geraldine West and Donna Taylor have very generously offered their services to streamline and organise the Shakespeare/Nativity costume collection and our range of “props”.  Teachers are sighing with relief ….  It’s a huge job that these two ladies have undertaken and we are most grateful.

There are whispers about, regarding the possibility of starting a Gardening Club for some interested children after school.  Keep your ears open for something louder, because support and help will be needed if it gets off the ground!  (Whoops, “into the ground” would be better!)

The Pick Up Zone has been running smoothly and efficiently, thank you, and your continued co-operation will be most appreciated.

Enjoy these lillies by 4th class students this week...

 


Categories: Coordinators' Comments, John Colet

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