enrol details

Lunch menus

05
April
2013

From our kitchen: 8/4/13

On the menu this week...

Mon

CHEESE AND TOMATO RISOTTO

Tues

PASTA PRIMAVERA

Weds

SALAD ROLLS

Thurs

STIR FRY

Fri

PUMPKIN OR TOMATO SOUP

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

Much of our time is spent on managing relationships with spouses, children, friends and neighbours. We strive to make people feel good, positive and appreciated about themselves by setting good behaviour patterns such as self confidence, flexibility and humour. But often what we can sometimes forget to manage is our relationship with ourselves and food. It is known that good practices through the primary education process leads to more self aware and confident adults. This is why the luncheon time is as important as any other lesson of the day. Self control, service to others, gratitude, cleanliness, manners are all expressing themselves in this environment.

In the McLaren Hall we (kitchen staff and teachers) strive to keep a healthy and happy balance to the children’s overall experience. We manage many dietary restrictions happily, we interact with children daily, smiling, and we eat the food that is given to us. One of the most exciting times of the day (for the children) is riddle time. It is the ‘talk’ that leads to great conversation and analysis. Making the entire experience enjoyable is the breakthrough to helping reduce eating disorders at any age.

Watching what we eat and when we eat it is a steady way to self control and weight maintenance. When you or your children overdo it, fall back to the basics-

·         Eat lightly every few hours

·         Make a fist – portion control, that is the size of your stomach.

·         Dig into some nuts or anything red, orange or green for a snack

·         Eat slowly, with awareness

·         Adopt power and super foods into your diet

·         And...move more than you did yesterday


Donna Moor with the daily riddle board.

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

28
March
2013

From our kitchen: 28/3/13

On the menu after Easter...


Mon

EASTER MONDAY - closed

Tues

SAUCY PASTA

Weds

NACHOS

Thurs

NOODLES (with veggie squiggles)

Fri

‘GOOD FRIDAY’ FRIED RICE

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

It was some relief to see my mistake on the last menu, I felt like I had got an entire week back, so my apologies for the calendar oversight.

The Easter break and the school holidays are nearly upon us so remember the one key rule to holiday eating, drinking and frivolity is WATER.

The humble glass of H2O has enormous healing and weight loss properties. It allows the body, particularly the brain to hydrate (or rehydrate depending on the size of the previous evening’s party). A headache, without accident, it simply your brain saying give me water, not paracetamol.

Water, with the help of haemoglobin, also delivers the water soluble vitamins C and B complex to the entire body. The water soluble vitamins are easily destroyed or washed away during food preparation. Try to steam vegetables, keep milk and grains away from strong light and wash vegetables when they are whole. Generally, water soluble vitamins are not harmful because the body excretes excess levels.

Water also cleans the liver, kidneys and all major organs of the body, so the more you drink, the cleaner your body is internally.

There is no hard rule to the consumption of water but if you are not drinking four 300ml bottles of water per day plus another for every hour of exercise, pregnant or outdoors you are depleting yourself of the hydration and vitamins necessary to keep you feeling bright and happy.

This holiday, think of adding a glass of water before your breakfast (inclusive of the Berrocca-if necessary), before every meal, between every alcoholic beverage, and before bed, your body will thank you.

Happy Easter to all!
Donna Moor

 

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

22
March
2013

From our kitchen:25/3/13

On the menu this week...



Mon

TOMATO SOUP

Tues

PIZZA

Weds

DUTCH CHEESE & ZUCCHINI SLICE

Thurs

VEGGIES AND BEANS

Fri

FRIED RICE

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

This week in the kitchen we have been observing some great manners, helpfulness, service to others and the best ever...healthy eating habits. I thought it necessary to give praise to all the children who are observing their health and commend their general conduct in the Lunch Room. We have even seen some die hard lunch boxes disappear to take the leap of faith into the enjoyment of the shared meal. But remember, there is always something available for simple palates.

NB: Lunch boxes are not allowed in McLaren Hall without reference to extreme allergies and Head Mistress approval.

I would also like to take the time thank our Mums who ‘slave’ every day to produce extraordinary meals and side dishes for the children and staff alike.

I would also add that some classes have even had class discussions on how to help children with simple or undeveloped taste buds, whilst keeping everybody happy around their table. The true nature of John Colet comes out in some remarkable ways and it is a joy to see!

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

15
March
2013

From our kitchen: 18/3/13

On the menu this week...



Mon

EGG AND SALAD SANDWICHES

Tues

VEGGIE SPAGHETTI

Weds

ROASTED MIXED VEGETABLES

Thurs

NACHOS (with salsa and sour cream)

Fri

KIDS MINESTRONE SOUP (with garlic croutons)

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

Recently I’ve been researching diabetes to help keep our diabetic students well balanced and their post-meal blood glucose levels even. The most interesting thing here is that the required diet for a diabetic is one of the best for all of us. It always comes down to carbohydrates NOT being the enemy, but instead being a useful cultural preference that can be tilted in our favour easily with some simple substitutions.

Low Carb or Low GI? That is the question! For many years, the ‘Low Carb’ diet (lifestyle) has been the one preferred for losing weight and maintaining blood glucose levels. Now that we have the added benefit of the Low GI options, the answer is simple. The Low GI diet is the very best for all of us.

‘Low Carb’ diets, in the short term, for post-holiday or pre-holiday if you’re so inclined, do have benefits. They drop weight fast, reduce blood glucose levels and lower blood triglycerides (fat). This can be maintained for very short periods of time by most of us, but very difficult socially and realistically. The downside is that the long term deprivation of carbohydrates eventually raises the LDL (Low Density Lipoproteins-cholesterols which are bad, because they cause heart disease). Basically, the lower the density the worse it gets.

Low GI diet really does help reduce post-meal blood glucose spikes. It helps you lose weight more progressively and sustainably and it has even been proven that it lowers average blood glucose levels, improves blood cholesterol and triglycerides (stored energy source that are mostly stored in the VLDL-Very Low Density Lipoproteins-very bad). The best news is that it does delay development of diabetes in those of us at risk.

The best part of a Low GI diet is that it simply involves the substitution of high GI food (white processed sugary stuff) to Low GI foods (wholegrain unprocessed brown stuff) for each category of foods. Eg white bread to multigrain sourdough spelt, cup cake to sugarless bran muffin, white rice to brown rice. Don’t forget to change some of those high animal fat products into healthy vegetable oils and foods.

Remember to substitute not avoid. The Rule is simple - 40/40/20/80.  Energy should come from - 40% carbs, 40% fats, and 20% protein, and then choose the right ones 80% of the time. 
Donna Moor
 

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

08
March
2013

From our kitchen: 11/3/13

On the menu this week...

Mon

SQUIGGLY NOODLES/ASIAN NOODLES

Tues

SAUCY PASTA

Weds

BURRITOS   

Thurs

CHEESE AND TOMATO RISOTTO

Fri

MAC ‘N’ CHEESE

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

Thank you to all those parents who have filled in their allergy forms and returned them to school.

Recently I have noticed a lot of ‘packed lunches’ being eaten at the table during lunch which goes against the basic function of our school kitchen. Our goal is to provide a varied, nutritious and wholesome, vegetarian meal. All children with allergies and intolerances are being catered for individually and with great care.

I have been at John Colet now for 7 years with a son who is one of the fussiest eaters at school. He has never starved in his life. Yes, I have always worried, but I have persevered with understanding the effect that ‘positive peer pressure’ and the onset of the ‘different food recognition technique’ will work its magic.

One of the most powerful methods of getting kids to eat is ‘recognition’. The other is a solid parental resolve. Basically it is what you have given them and how you have handled it. I was totally over protective, which created my fussy eater...my Mum used to peel grapes for him!!! Stop laughing; mine is a food first family.

I would urge that you let the wonder of group eating and gratitude for a meal prepared on their behalf take hold. If your child does not like a certain meal, he or she is simply unfamiliar to them. All dieticians suggest that it takes 20-100 attempts for some children to grasp at new flavours so, perseverance is King!

On that note, here is my recipe for the vegetarian nachos, so you too can help in the familiarisation of food for school lunches. The lunch room is an amazing place with amazing people, it is worth the push.
 
Nacho recipe...Home amounts

1/2 chopped celery

2 chopped zucchinis

2 chopped carrots

1/4 cauliflower chopped

2 small chopped onions

2 tins mixed beans (3,4 or 5 bean mix)

2 cans tinned toms

(any solid vegetable that you have will also do - eg sweet potatoes, squash, green beans)

 

about 1-2 Tab of each - to taste

sweet paprika

smoked paprika

fresh garlic

fresh ginger

oregano

salt

pepper

chilli

splash brown vinegar

 

Lightly fry all vegies for about 4-5mins - not brown

Add in herbs, spices and vinegar - cook 1-2 mins further

Add rinsed beans and tomatoes

Cook until tender on a low simmer (8-10 mins)

Check consistency; add a little water or more tomatoes and or herbs/spices to your desired tastes.

 Blend if you need to...we do. Omit any allergy foods and substitute because you can’t wreck it.

 
Enjoy!
Donna Moor

Categories: Lunch menus

28
February
2013

From our kitchen: 4/3/13

On the menu this week...

Mon

SOUP WITH BREAD ROLLS

Tues

VEGIE SAUSAGE ROLLS

Weds

CHEESY QUICHE

Thurs

SALAD ROLLS

Fri

NACHOS
Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

Salt is on the lips of the media, yet again. Many people think that salt is the enemy of life, but with a healthy lifestyle and diet, salt is simply another one of earth’s wonders.

You would be a puddle without salt maintaining cellular stability. It is also a totally natural product.

What we must know is that iodised sea salt, Himalayan salt or Murray River salts are the best dietary sources of salt as they contain useful minerals to the body. It is the old ‘table salt’ that is added to our food after it has been served that is the great worry.

This argument has come forward, like many others, following our love of fast foods and pre-packaged food that many of us (over 40’s) grew up on. Our mothers went to work and ‘convenience foods’ took our taste buds to great new heights.

When using salt, use it in the cooking process to enhance the natural flavours within your food. Allowing it to absorb and combine naturally is better for you and makes the food pleasurable. And remove the salt shaker from the dinner table. It is a chef’s nightmare to have someone add salt and pepper to their food before they have even tasted...because they make food to taste perfect as it is, by adding salt in the cooking process.

If you must add it to the top of your food use the right type and simply reduce the quantity. Food loves salt and salt loves food. Make sure it is not you that loves salt, and be a healthier version of yourself.
Donna Moor
Chef


Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

22
February
2013

From our kitchen: 25/2/13

On the menu this week...

 

Mon

VEGIE WEDGES AND BEANS

Tues

NACHOS

Weds

TOMATO OR PUMPKIN SOUP

Thurs

PASTA PRIMAVERA

Fri

BAKED VEGETABLE PAELLA

Dairy, egg, lactose, gluten and wheat free and vegan options provided daily.

In the dining hall we try to focus on the present moment; to ‘shift down a gear’ and encourage a more mindful eating practice, not just shovel down food to get out playing. Being mindful at the dinner table helps slow down the consumption of food and regulates digestion. It also allows us to receive and serve others with greater pleasure and attention.

We will be adding herbs from my garden, such as oregano, rosemary, sage and mint, which boost the children’s’ vitamin, mineral and antioxidant intake. All of these herbs have huge antioxidant properties such as cancer fighting, increased memory and clean breath. They also help ward off the upcoming season change blues.

It is also coming up to that time of the year that the days grow shorter so we need to encourage our children to stay outside to play to keep up their vitamin D stores. There is a growing paradox in our ‘sunburnt country’ that our rate of Vitamin D deficiencies is rising. It is now over 58%. We are working longer hours indoors, children are playing in front of computers and communicating by e-mail or Skype rather than by ‘push bike’ in person and we are protecting ourselves from the sun in every form. Vitamin D can be found in foods such as milk, yoghurt, mushrooms, eggs and fatty fish and is crucial for bone and muscle development. It also helps prevent osteoporosis as it aids in the absorption of calcium and it lowers the risk of cancer.

So get outside and play happily...but wear a hat! You need the sunshine not the tan.

Many parents have asked for the recipe for the vegetarian sausage rolls. My recipe is for 400 rolls, so here is my closest calculation to a normal serve;

1 440gr can chickpeas

1 cup cottage cheese

1 large onion

1 cup oats

½ cup bread crumbs

1 tsp Italian herb mix

 

1 Tsp soy sauce or tamari

3 60gr eggs

S&P (if desired-I don’t use salt)

3 pieces of puff pastry (any brand you like)

2 Tsp Milk- for glazing or olive oil spray

1.       In a food processor, place chickpeas, onions, cottage cheese, soy sauce and eggs. Process well.

2.       Add oats, bread crumbs, herbs, S&P, pulse until combined. The mix should be wet but solid. If too dry add a little H2O and pulse. If too wet, add a handful of oats and pulse.

3.       Makes 12 rolls. Cut each piece of puff in half. Spread even amount of mixture down both length. Roll and cut in half. Repeat 3 times.

4.       Glaze with milk (or olive oil spray).

5.       Place in a 200oC oven for 8-12 mins.

6.       Note: if freezing bake for 7-8 mins, cool and freeze. Reheat in 180oC oven for 10 mins. This way you will not burn the pastry and they will be crisp.

7.       Intolerances – change or remove anything – it still works!!!
Donna Moor
Chef

Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

15
February
2013

From our kitchen: 18/2/13

Weekly Menu

Mon

VEGETABLE PASTA

Tues

ASIAN NOODLES

Weds

VEGETARIAN PIZZA

Thurs

TOMATO RICE

Fri

BAKED VEGETABLES

One of the great mysteries of school life is the idea of the ‘balanced lunch box’.

At John Colet, the ‘lunch box’ is broken into pre-packed ‘morning tea’ and ‘sit-down lunch’ in our dining hall.

There are currently four core items of food needed for this balance.  It is also generally advised to add one other to the earlier ‘morning tea’ meal for the active child.

Firstly, the drink; water is advised as the best choice for hydration and digestion. Milk can be added as the next best choice, as long as it is in conjunction with water. A hydrated brain means a more alert child for afternoon learning.

Secondly we come to the ‘snack’ (morning tea) – a slice of fruit or vegetable, wholegrain crackers and cheese. Items like sugary biscuits, muesli bars, chocolate covered or highly salted snacks, only sets a small child up for an insulin crash later in the day.

Thirdly, the ‘main meal’ (sit down lunch) is always fruit with a plate of food that incorporates vegetables, proteins and grains. These may be pasta, salads, sandwiches, soups or Mexican beans etc. We always try to ‘mix it up’ over the week so as not to add too much untoward pressure on you or your child.

Finally, it is recommended that you add an extra snack for the very active child or just the active days.  These are usually for the afternoon and include low sugar fruit bars, wholegrain crackers with spread or even a small packet of savoury biscuits.

All that said; always remember a ‘King’s breakfast’ is the best attack for any child’s day...or adults for that matter!

 

PLEASE REMEMBER TO PACK A PLATE, BOWL AND CUP EVERY DAY.
Also, on Fridays PISA students need to bring a packed lunch.

Donna Moor
Chef


Categories: Lunch menus, John Colet

24
October
2012

Who killed Hamlet's father?

Pre-Shakespeare Festivities

At Tuesday lunch,  'Hamlet Rolls' were served to the children, and our wonderful catering parents ran a Shakespeare quiz for all:  Hamlet is the prince of what country? Whose ghost visits Hamlet at this castle?  What is Hamlet's girlfriend's name?  How does Hamlet's mother die?  Who killed Hamlet's father?
Thursday, it was 'Portia's Pasta' quiz day. The questions were even trickier.

Treats for the winners and plenty of excited Primary children all in groups brainstorming answers.

Categories: Lunch menus, Shakespeare & Drama, John Colet

<<  6 7 8 9 10 [11